Amadea Noemi Łakatosz

Photo. Marlena Lena Żerkowska, source

 

Amadea Noemi Łakatosz, born 21.03.1997 in Poznań, comes from a Roma family that has always been involved in art. She graduated from the General Jadwiga Zamoyska Secondary School XXV in Poznań, with a focus on humanities and theatre. She also completed a course in floristry at Cosinus Post-Secondary School, where she now also attends an occupational therapy course.

 

She is interested in visual arts, acting, psychology, photography and dancing. She has been a kids animator for over 6 years. She does face painting, conducts art, theatre and film workshops – for example, on the Utubersi platform. She eagerly engages in social activities and artistic projects, both in Poland and abroad, e.g. in Austria or Romania.

 

Her artworks and photographs have been repeatedly presented at numerous local and national exhibitions, including the Provincial Office, the Aula of Adam Mickiewicz University, the House of Brittany, Wilson Park, 2.pietro Gallery, the Ethnographic Museum in Poznan, as well as the Prudnik House of Culture.

 

The artist often donates her paintings to charities, e.g. to fairs or charity auctions organised by the Amici Association for Children and Their Parents. Together with her brother, Delfin Łakatosz, she runs a YouTube channel with more than 15,000 viewers.

 

In 2018, she joined a cabaret formation Nie do Pary. The group’s performances gained big recognition from the audience and were awarded in many competitions. Since 2018, Amadea attends the Blancari Artistic Academy, where she practices oriental dance under the supervision of her instructor, Blanca Rische. Her dance debut took place on the stage of the Asz Theatre at the Dąbrówka House of Culture in Poznań.

 

In 2018 she joined the Cudzysłów theatre group and performed in the Diamond Swing show at the Zamek Cultural Centre and at the Łejery Common Stage in Poznań.

 

Link to the performance: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zkz5bxJeN_0

 

Amadea Łakatosz is a laureate of many professional competitions and a long-term holder of the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Administration scholarship.

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Delfin Łakatosz

 


Delfin Łakatosz – a filmmaker, director, cinema enthusiast, video trainer. He is involved in numerous social, artistic and cultural projects. Delfin is a multiple visual arts grant holder of the scholarship competition for Roma students organised by the Ministry of the Interior and Administration. He’s an author of many films, videos and etudes showing the life of Roma in various situations. Delfin likes to travel and work with people. He has a great eye for capturing real emotions which creates beautiful memories after years.

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Artists

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Plenairs

As we can read in the encyclopedia: “plein-air” [fr.(en) plen air ‘under the open sky’] is simply painting outdoors, directly from nature, in open space. Outdoor painting was initiated at the beginning of the 19th century by the English school. It became popular at the end of the 19th century, thanks to the Impressionists and then included in the artistic education. Nowadays, plein-airs is also a term used for a stay of a group in one place, where they create artistic work. Fundacja Dom Kultury’s plein-airs refer to a post-war tradition of group outdoor painting, and at the same time, overcome one of their unfavorable features. Namely, they draw on thegroup-creative traditions – the people participating in the workshops simultaneously bond with each other, overcoming elitism. The workshops are attended by local residents, participants of “Kłodzka Roma”, a Roma culture festival and specialists in other fields who are leading workshops as a part of the festival.

 

An important point of reference for our initiative were the plein-airs and an international artistic residency program “Jaw Dikh!” in Czarna Góra. The initiative is attended by Roma andnon-Roma authors, curators and theorists and has been organized since 2011 by Małgorzata Mirga-Tas. The curator and artist has shown that the magic circle can be broken and the idea of outdoor painting can be used as a binder between different words.

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In the studio of Krzysztof Gil

We were in Krzysztof Gil’s studio just before the opening of the exhibition They call me Gypsy, though that’s not my name / The more you trim the bigger it becomes.

 

The Gdańsk group exhibition took place in two locations – it was divided into a part where we could see the works of many artists and a part with Gil’s individual exhibition, forming a sub-narrative. During our visit we learned what the process of documenting the subject matter of the works looks like: searching and analysis; critical reading of historical, ethnographic, cultural, pop-cultural knowledge constructs, to which Gil then refers in his works.

 

Who doesn’t know the melody that obtrusively plays in your heads – it is the Caje Sukarije song interpreted in 1999 by the duo Kayah & Bregovič: “They call me Gypsy although that’s not my name / Because who cares when the name doesn’t match”. In the first words of the text about the exhibition They Call Me Gypsy… The curator Ania Batko points out that it is not an exhibition about the Roma, their history or culture, but about the construct of a “gypsy” – ‘a made-up character who never existed’. The gypsy is here a symbol of appropriation, cultural colonialism, stories and imagination spun on the border between what is Polish and what is Roma.

 

The gallery space adapted by Gil looks like a cross between a circus fairy’s tent and a noble study of curiosities of an amateur collector from the 19th century. In both cases, the constructed image of the Roma gypsy is as true as it is completely false. The pointing out of the colonial “difference” by the “pariah” may be a mockery of the way in which the colonised are seen; how their representation is created; an element of the minority’s game with the majority, which simultaneously carries their image and uses it in its own interest.

 

They call me Gypsy, though that’s not my name
Curator: Ania Batko

 

Technical cooperation: Krzysztof Gil

 

Gdańsk City Gallery 1, 2 (Piwna 27/29, Powroźnicza 13/15)
16.07-26.09.2021

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In the studio of Krzysztof Gil

We were in Krzysztof Gil’s studio just before the opening of the exhibition They call me Gypsy, though that’s not my name / The more you trim the bigger it becomes.

 

The Gdańsk group exhibition took place in two locations – it was divided into a part where we could see the works of many artists and a part with Gil’s individual exhibition, forming a
sub-narrative. During our visit we learned what the process of documenting the subject matter of the works looks like: searching and analysis; critical reading of historical, ethnographic, cultural, pop-cultural knowledge constructs, to which Gil then refers in his works.    More »

 

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Małgorzata Mirga-Tas’s studio

We visited Mirga-Tas’ studio with the camera just before her departure to Kosovo. We had the opportunity to watch her give the final touches to works that were later shown at the Autostrada Biennale. This remarkable young biennial was founded in 2014 and is a two-speed “highway”: an open biennial, which of course we can see every two years (Mirga-Tas is participating in the third iteration) and a permanent KFOR institution, where artists’ residencies take place and the process of preparing the exhibition is open to the public, making the creation of artworks a form of learning and critical thinking. This time, curators Övül Ö. Durmuşoğlu and Joanna Warsza made “incompletion” the starting point of the biennale and its slogan became a question – “What if the journey…”. The time of the pandemic affected us all and everyone had their “unfinished business” through it. As the curators write: “What if the journey… is an exhibition about the two ends of the road that meet between host and guest, between diaspora and local, between infrastructure and intimacy. What if the journey… is also an exhibition about art as a way out of everyday traps. The exhibition will take you on a journey that starts in the centre of Pristina, continues along the Lumbardhi River in Prizren, and ends in an art bar in Peja. (…) “As long as there is a journey, there is hope,” says Valbona Zherka, an artist whose work has too often been marginalised in the past.(…) The Third Autostrada Biennale is an invitation to an incomplete journey in which art and survival are an emergency kit to travel to the present, to and from Kosovo – to Berlin, Istanbul, Warsaw and back. Or somewhere in between.”

 

Małgorzata Mirga-Tas, together with a Roma activist Edis Galushim and members of the Prizren Roma community, covered a building with large-format portraits of remarkable Roma women, known both locally and internationally. Mirga-Tas’s collages are made from fragments of various fabrics: many of the fabrics come directly from the wardrobes of the women depicted and consist of pieces of skirts, scarves or shirts sewn onto curtains, drapes, bedding or rags. The materials used by the artist literally carry history, traces of life and use along with their energy. The canvases become the architectural basis of the artworks and at the same time the visual basis for creating feminist narratives. “Based on years of experience working with Roma communities in Roma settlements, I have noticed that Roma women are gradually emancipating themselves from patriarchal structures. More and more Roma women are active, they strive for change, they fight for education for their children, they want their voice to be heard in the usually very traditional Roma environment.” Mirga-Tas’s work raises many questions key for our times, including the crucial one: ‘What does minority feminism look like in a traditional community? Can there be mutual acculturation, and if so, how can the majority learn from the minority?” Finally, can working on identity, especially one rooted in the experience of injustice, be an affirmative and emancipatory strategy rather than a reductionist, isolating one?” The women featured in the artwork are : Shpresa Agushi Gnjilane -Advocate for Women’s Rights; Nicoleta Bitu – social activist from Bucharest; Zinet Galuszi – housewife from Prizren; Delaine Le Bas – artist from London; Esma Redzepova – legendary artist, singer from Skopje; Anonymous – representing all Roma women.

 

3rd Autostrada Biennale What If a Journey…

curators: Övül Ö. Durmuşoğlu and Joanna Warsza Prisztina – 1.07.21-11.09.21

Prizren – 17.07.21-11.09.21

Peja – 19.07.21-11.09.21

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Małgorzata Mirga-Tas’s studio

We visited Mirga-Tas’ studio with the camera just before her departure to Kosovo. We had the opportunity to watch her give the final touches to works that were later shown at the Autostrada Biennale. This remarkable young biennial was founded in 2014 and is a two-speed “highway”: an open biennial, which of course we can see every two years (Mirga-Tas is participating in the third iteration) and a permanent KFOR institution, where artists’ residencies take place and the process of preparing the exhibition is open to the public, making the creation of artworks a form of learning and critical thinking.  More »

 

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Artist’s workshops

“Workshop”, “studio” is “space where a painter, sculptor or a writer works”. Sounds easy – right?
However, we can differentiate many types of functions of artistic workshops:

 

– master studio, academic studio, open studio
This type of studio has a long tradition in the pedagogical tradition of the Academies of Fine Arts from all over the world. Students would gather around the master-teacher, learning under his guidance. As time passed, they would create whole artistic schools, e.g. the Sopot School, the Polish School of Posters or artistic groups (resulting from the similarity of interests, subject matters and creative techniques, etc.).

 

– an art studio as an exhibition, a show
Occasionally, the studio formula becomes the inspiration for the exhibition form. The artists work in the exhibition space, in the presence of the audience, and the exhibition grows with new works, created in the heat of the moment.

 

Portraits or self-portraits of artists in their studios were also often created. Edouard Manet in 1868 painted a portrait of Emil Zola. The environment in which the painter placed the writer is full of attributes drawing attention to his profession or passions. Including a reproduction of Olympia, a work by this very painter, which Zola defended with his pen. To this day, the space intrigues other artists: cycles of works about ateliers have been created by, among others, Zuzanna Janin or Daniel Rumiancew.

 

– historic artist’s studio
The studios of prominent deceased artists are sometimes turned into quasi-museums. We can visit them, experience the atmosphere of the space where they created. We can also admire their works; sometimes unfinished and ready works of art – gifts for their friends. We can also find unique collections accumulated throughout the years in private space – valuable documents of widely understood artistic and social activity, collections of bizarre objects being inspirations for works created, or private ego-documents. An example here is the reconstruction of Francis Bacon’s studio (Dublin City Gallery, The Hugh Lane) – if anyone accuses you of being messy…Well Bacon was a genius in this area too!

 

– workshop, artist’s studio
As we can see, studios are different. In the old days they were haunted by patrons/principals, sometimes very prominent (queens, popes, etc.). Even such people were flattered by the possibility of participating in the creative acts. Therefore, sometimes special performances took place in the studios: theatres of creation (which were referred to, for example, by Franciszek Starowieyski (who made 20-something performances of the “Theatre of Drawing” in e.g. Warsaw, Venice, Paris, Seville, Chicago as well as cyclical TV programme). The traces of this custom, still to this day, are the “studio visits”- when collectors, critics, curators visit studios in order to get to know the artist of their interest surrounded by their works. In the 20th century, however, the studio became a strictly private place where the artist could seclude themselves, concentrate and create. And where they are reluctant to let strangers in!

 

Hence, the series of visits to the studios of Romani artists is an honour and a pleasure for Fundacja Dom Kultury. We can show you how and where the artists work and how (and if) genius loci affects their work.

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